Kroger’s Famous Hand pies are being pulled down due to egg allergens

The hand pies sold in Kroger stores across the region are being pulled due to unauthorized egg allergens. Hand pies sold in Kroger stores throughout the Cincinnati area have been pulled due to unauthorized egg allergy. O Pie O Bakehouse announced the voluntary recall Friday, saying the chicken pot pies and Sagg Paneer hand pies may contain eggs.

While, after this investigation the Company officials said the ingredient label did not mention egg allergens. Company officials said these hand pies were sold for nearly two years, between March 10, 2019 and April 7 this year.

Kroger’s Famous Hand pies are being pulled down due to egg allergens

They were sold at Kroger locations in Oakley, Hyde Park, Kroger on the Rhine (Downtown), Western Hills, Corville, Anderson, Harpers Point, Liberty Township, Kyle Station, Pickett Ridge, Coleraine, Harrison, Dent, Amelia, Lebanon and Marymont.

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Officials at O ​​Pie O said the problem was discovered during an inspection by the Ohio Department of Agriculture. There have been no reports of illnesses involving the products that were consumed in the recall, however, people with egg allergy or severe egg allergy are at risk of developing a serious or life-threatening allergic reaction if they consume this product. Individuals who exhibit signs or symptoms of a foodborne illness or allergy should contact a physician immediately. Customers with egg allergy who have purchased the affected product must throw it away or return it to O Pie O Bakehouse for a refund. Now, what is your take on this? Let us know in the comment section below!

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Kroger collaborates with UNT to combat student food insecurity

According to the recent news, the Grocery giant Kroger assists University of North Texas students who are facing food insecurity on campus. More and more colleges across the country are responding to a growing number of students with little or no food.

Keeping this in mind grocery giant Kroger is partnering with the University of North Texas to help feed food-insecure students. As part of its commitment to ending hunger with zero waste, the Kroger Corporation made a $ 250,000 financial commitment to NTU leaders Thursday morning.

Kroger collaborates with UNT to combat student food insecurity

Furthermore, an increasing number of colleges and universities across the country are adding food stores on campus to help students who don’t know where their next meal will come from. Nationwide, 30% of college students are food insecure, which can affect student success and contribute to mental health problems, according to research by Lisa Henry, anthropology professor at the University of New Jersey. The Dean of Students at UNT opened a food store on campus in 2015, which has served more than 10,000 visitors. The new partnership will include a new name for the food bank: UNT Food Pantry introduced by Kroger. Demand has grown amid the Covid-19 pandemic, according to UNT’s Dean of Students. “We have a lot of partners on campus and in the community who throw pizza parties for free lunches all the time,” said Student Maureen McGuiness, dean of Student University. “In the midst of a pandemic, this does not exist.”

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While some students facing food insecurity may struggle with feelings of shame, others are eager to voice their needs, McGuinness says. Hoping to spare students any embarrassment, there is a back entrance available in the warehouse located in the Diamond Eagle Student Resource Center. To learn more about Kroger’s UNT Food Pantry, click here. Let us know what you think about it in the comment section below! How they can make this campaign better?

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Why it’s Unfair for Kroger Workers to “Not Have Hero Pay”?

This debate of Kroger which is largest and finest grocery chains in United States have closed many stores and refuse to pay their workers hero pay. Workers’ protest announces the closure of the Kroger store amid the “Hero’s Salary” decree.

A large group of protesters gathered Thursday afternoon amid the announced closure of Food 4 Less in East Hollywood. It is one of three Kroger stores in the Los Angeles area due to close due to “Hero Pay” law. In response, Kroger issued the following statement:

They said that “Ralphs and Food 4 Less has made the tough decision to shut down three of its 68 Los Angeles locations. The closings follow a Los Angeles City Council mandate that requires a select group of employers to provide additional pay to frontline workers, but not all companies. Which hires frontline workers.

Why it’s Unfair for Kroger Workers to “Not Have Hero Pay”

The mandate will add an additional $ 20 million to operating costs over the next 120 days, making the continued operation of the three underperforming sites financially unsustainable despite our efforts to overcome the challenges we were facing.

Already in these locations, the overpayment mandate makes it impossible to run a financially sustainable business that ensures our ability to continue serving the Los Angeles community in those three locations with reliable access to fresh, affordable groceries and other essentials. In Los Angeles and we remain committed to our dedicated front-line partners who serve 65 other companies’ physical locations. ”

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Previously, Kroger proclaimed on March 10 that it was closing its Food4Less 5420 W. Sunset Blvd. And two Ralphs stores, one at 9616 W. Pico Blvd. The other is at 3300 W. Slauson Ave., On May 15th. Kroger said the three stores were “underperforming”. The chief legislative analyst in Los Angeles decided that the potential economic effects of the law include temporary increases in labor costs as a percentage of company sales, potential higher prices for consumers, possible delayed store openings, renewals, pay raises or promotions for employees, and potential stress. On distressed stores that may lead to store closures and reduced working hours for some employees.

However, the CLA also decided that higher wages could also benefit other businesses in the city, as more people would have extra money to buy additional items. It can also help people pay off their debts and increase their savings Now, what are your thoughts on it? Let us know about it? In the comment section below!

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Kroger called Argus the winner after the pandemic

Remember when Kroger and their partner Argus were collaborated? Now, Kroger and Argus is back on Kroger (-0.1% KR) after attending last week’s investor meeting.

In this regard, Analyst Chris Garja stated her thoughts which are as following. While Kroger has benefited from higher grocery demand with the spread of the Coronavirus. We believe the company has excellent prospects after the crisis, with the help of affordable private brands and robust customer analysis. As well as through online ordering and pavement selection – in.

Kroger called Argus the winner after the pandemic

In addition, almost all of its stores. The epidemic pushed the US economy into recession, led to high unemployment rates, and destroyed large components of the retail market. It has caused investors to distinguish between business models that are in a good position for the future and those that face major challenges. ”

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While, the Kroger is called a survivor because it takes market share before and after the pandemic with the help of competitive pricing. Argus expects KR’s EBIT to rise over the next few years as the company benefits from ongoing investments and new dividend streams. Argus maintains a buy rating on Kroger and target price at $ 42 against the average Wall Street target price of $ 35.67. Now, what are your thoughts? Let us know in the comment section below!

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Council members want to investigate closed Kroger stores over the hero’s wages

According to the recent news, two councilors submitted a proposal to have the city investigate the reasons for the Kroger Corporation’s decision to close three stores in Los Angeles.

Right after the passage of a city decree requiring grocery stores and large pharmacies to deliver an additional $ 5 per hour to employees in risk allowance amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

Council members want to investigate closed Kroger stores over the hero's wages

In addition, “The city has an interest in considering whether legislative action should be taken to address these closings and other grocery store closures in the future, especially in areas of the city known as food deserts,” a suggestion made by council members Marquis Harris – read Dawson and Paul Kuritz.

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In order to do this, the city council should seek information from grocery stores and their executive management to better understand their measures and inform the city council of ways that might protect the city and its residents from the consequences of these types of lockdowns.”

While, Kroger announced on March 10 that it was closing its Food4Less 5420 W. Sunset Blvd. And two Ralphs stores, one at 9616 W. Pico Blvd. The other is at 3300 W. Slauson Ave., On May 15th. Kroger said the three stores were “underperforming”. In the proposal, Kurtz and Harris Dawson noted that Kroger officials said the shutdown had been planned long before the law was enacted, “adding to allegations that these stores are losing millions of dollars annually.” The Cincinnati-based company had already come under fire after announcing on February 1 that it would close Ralphs and Food4Less in Long Beach after passing that city’s $ 4 risk compensation law. These stores are scheduled to close on April 17th.

The official movement will be focused on the city council exercise its authority to question witnesses, compel witnesses to come and present evidence to determine the reason for the Kroger Company’s decision to close stores. Instruct the chief legislative analyst and city clerk, with assistance from the city attorney general, to require store executives to formally appear within 30 days and to issue subpoenas if they refuse to attend. A risk allowance of $ 5 is required for all non-management employees at grocery stores or drug retail stores with more than 300 employees nationwide, or more than 10 on-site employees, as well as retail stores, such as Walmart and Target, that specialize 10% of their sales floor is to grocery stores or drug retail. Let us know what are your thoughts on it? In the comment section below!

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