QFC Financial Center closes two Seattle stores, blames new $ 4 city risk compensation law

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This news has been circling on from a quite a few times as Kroger, closed few stores and decided not to give the bonus amount. The heated debate over Seattle’s law to pay grocery workers $ 4 an hour has escalated sharply this week. the QFC Financial Center announced it would close two Seattle locations by April 24 – and partly blamed the new law.

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QFC Financial Center closes two Seattle stores, blames new $ 4 city risk compensation law

Although the QFC admits both locations – at 416 15th Avenue East on Capitol Hill and 8400 35th Ave. NE at Wedgwood – They were “underperforming,” their decision to close them “accelerated” under the Seattle Hazard Pay Act, which was approved by City Council Jan 25.

While, the company said in a statement on Tuesday that the law imposed new costs at a time when “grocery stores are operating with very slim profit margins in a very competitive landscape”. The law applies to grocery companies with more than 500 employees worldwide and to stores over 10,000 square feet during the civil emergency caused by the Coronavirus.

But the QFC explanation was met with a scathing response from city politicians, business officials, some shoppers, and locals in general. Some have said that the QFC and its parent company, Kroger, have benefited greatly during the pandemic and are using the risk allowance to deviate from other economic factors, including plans to eventually redevelop at least one of the sites.

“Their plans were to close long before COVID,” said Shari Table, 82, who said she has been shopping at 15th Avenue since the 1980s. “I’m not actually happy because they blame $ 4 an hour for these people.” The dispute comes amid a rampant fight over the hazard pay for grocery workers, who experts say face a high risk of COVID-19. While some grocery chains, such as Seattle-based PCC and California-based Trader Joe’s, recently introduced workers to pandemic-related increases, Kroger refuses. The company, which also operates Fred Mayer stores in the Pacific Northwest, recently announced that it would close two supermarket stores in Southern California due to local pay raise rules. Now, what are your thoughts on it? Let us know in the comment section below!

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